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2nd XI T20 Finals Day: Match Report

over 6 years ago | Uncategorised

The 2nd XI became National 2nd XI Twenty20 champions for the first time, beating Lancashire and Kent in two hard fought games at Arundel Castle Cricket Ground. Middlesex had won six from eight group games played to come second in the South Regional League, finishing behind Kent.

Having lost the toss in the second semi-final, North group winners Lancashire elected to bat, following a high scoring first semi-final which saw Kent defeat Durham.

Max Holden and Gurjit Sandhu bowled two tight first overs, with Sandhu picking up a wicket in his first over. Despite taking 16 from each of Sowter and Podmore's first overs, Lancashire struggled to assert any real authority on their innings, finishing 148 for 4. Middlesex used only five bowlers, with the spinners of Holden, Patel and Sowter only going for 77 runs in their 12 overs, Holden the most economical conceding 19, with Sandhu also picking up two wickets.

Middlesex's reply got off to the worst possible start, when Gubbins pulled a short delivery from England spinner Simon Kerrigan to mid-wicket from the first ball of the innings. Ryan Higgins steadied the ship with a composed 67, supported by Steve Eskinazi's 29. It was left to recent first eleven debutant George Scott to steer the team home, with an unbeaten 24 which saw Middlesex win with a ball to spare.

Another lost toss in the final meant a further opportunity to chase in the second game, and a change of plan saw Ravi Patel bowl the first Middlesex over. The pitch had baked in the Sussex sunshine, and Kent took time to adjust to its slower pace and exaggerated spin, in an innings which never really got going. Three wickets apiece for Sowter and Podmore, along with economical spells from Patel (4 overs for 10) and Sandhu (3 overs for 13) restricted Kent to 115 all out from 17 overs.

A more destructive innings from Higgins of 33 got Middlesex off to an assertive start in their reply, supported by 20 from Eskinazi. George Scott's 15 edged the Twos closer to the line, and it was left to Steel and Sowter to see Middlesex home with 19 and 8 respectively, to win with three overs to spare.

With the oldest player aged 23, and a youngest of 17, this Middlesex side was a true reflection of the team who had worked hard to reach Finals Day, and our members can be proud of the energy and passion that they played with throughout.

This was a truly wonderful achievement from a young group of players who have a huge amount of potential. Hopefully this is the first of many Middlesex trophies that they will amass in their careers.

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